The divorce process

What to expect from the divorce process

The process of getting a divorce in England and Wales will, of course, vary from case to case, as no two cases are identical. However, the basic principles behind a divorce will largely be the same, so this article explains what you can expect if you are considering getting divorced, or if you are already at the start of divorce proceedings. Firstly, the spouse that wants the divorce has to file for one. They are known as the petitioner or the applicant, and they fill in a divorce petition form that includes their full name and address and their spouse’s full name and address, and send three copies, a copy…

Well known Solicitor retires after 45 years in Boston

Richard Tinn retires from Sills & Betteridge LLP on 4th July, having started his legal career in Boston on 13th November 1967 with Grocock & Staniland (later Ringrose Law). He then set up his own firm Richard Tinn & Co. which was acquired by Sills & Betteridge in 2011. During his 45 years as a solicitor, Richard has practiced in a number of legal areas, for both private and commercial clients and very much appreciates those who have supported him and the staff he has worked with, especially those who were with him when he practised on his own. During his time in Boston, Richard was involved in several community…

What happens to your estate if you don’t leave a Will?

Most people will know what a Will is. It is a legal document which details how a person would like their “Estate” (which is made up of assets such as property, money and possessions) to be distributed after they pass away. The person who is making the Will is known as the “testator”. The two main reasons for leaving a Will are to protect your children and to provide for the people for whom you want to provide, which is why it is so important to make a Will. Whilst most people know what a Will is, a surprisingly large number of people pass away without leaving a Will. They…

What rights do cohabiting couples have when their partner dies?

Recent research carried out by the insurance company Direct Line showed that 38% – more than one third – of cohabiting couples living in the UK were unsure of what their rights would be should their partner pass away without leaving a will, and that one in ten cohabiting couples wrongly believed that they would be automatically entitled to inherit their partner’s share of any property that they lived in together. However, this is not the case. A surviving partner will only inherit if this is stated in the deceased partner’s will. This can come as an extremely nasty surprise to some people who are already mourning following the loss…

Stephen Wilson, Executive Head of Claims at Sills & Betteridge and accredited Fellow of APIL

Association of Personal Injury Lawyers launches “Compensation Explained”

The Association of Personal Injury Lawyers (APIL) have recently launched what they describe as their “latest public information venture”, an online booklet called “Compensation explained” which is a guide to personal injury compensation, its purpose, and its value to society. Who are APIL? APIL is a national not-for-profit membership group that was founded in 1990 by a group of barristers and solicitors who wanted to improve the services that were provided for victims of negligence and fight and campaign for the rights of injured people. They now have more than 3,5000 members and are “dedicated to changing the law, protecting and enhancing access to justice, and improving the services provided…

Requesting Judicial Assessment of merits at preliminary hearings

The Employment Tribunals Rules of Procedure provide that a Tribunal shall wherever practicable and appropriate encourage the use by the parties of the service of ACAS, judicial or other mediation, or other means of resolving their disputes by agreement. In October 2016 the President of the Employment Tribunals in England and Wales issued Presidential Guidance – Protocol on Judicial Assessments. The Protocol creates a confidential process whereby an Employment Judge can offer an earlier assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the parties’ respective cases. Judicial assessment involves evaluating the strength of the parties’ cases. Employment Judges will use their skill and experience in doing this, whilst remaining wholly impartial.…

Top five ways to raise investment for your business

Anyone who is planning to start up a brand new business or expand their existing business knows how crucial it is to raise finance in order to do so. There are many things you need to consider when raising capital, and there are many ways to do so. This article looks at five of the most common methods, which are: Selling Shares Bank Loans Grants Crowdfunding Borrowing from friends and family Selling Shares One of the most traditional ways of getting money (or more money) into your business is by selling shares to investors. This is only available to limited companies, and means that people invest money in to your…

Further sentencing changes to come in 2018 and beyond

Part 4 of our review of road traffic reform in 2017 In part 1 of our series on road traffic reform in 2017 we set out the new penalties drivers are facing following a number of sentencing reforms. In this article we highlight on going consultations and proposals for further reforms in 2018 and beyond. Causing death by dangerous driving currently attracts a maximum sentence of 14 years – the government has published proposals that drivers caught speeding, using a phone or under influence drink/drugs could now face life sentences if involved in a fatal collision. There is some debate as to whether this reform is necessary as prosecutors already…

haulage vehicle

2017 a year in review for the Haulage industry

A four part review of Road Traffic related legal news in 2017 – Part 3 In 2017 it was announced that DVSA officers will gain increased powers to impose fines for breaches of driver’s hours offences up from £300 for a single day to a possible total fine of £1500 for any five days where breaches have occurred in the last 28 days. This applies regardless of whether the offence was committed in the UK or abroad. Non UK drivers will also be subject to the fines and will require to pay on the spot. The start date for these fines is yet to be announced but will be widely…

How did the Taxi industry fare in 2017?

A four part review of Road Traffic law news in 2017 – Part 2 The big story for 2017 is Transport for London’s (TFL) decision to revoke Uber’s licence. Initially this decision will not result in any change. The Uber TFL licence was due to expire on 30 September however the company will be able to continue to operate until all appeals are exhausted. Given the high-profile nature of this decision, not only in terms of the UK market but also the potential impact internationally we can expect the appeal process to be lengthy and exhaustive. Recent reports are indicating that this initial decision marks the end of the beginning…