Everybody should have a Will

Natalie Wright, solicitor with Sills & Betteridge, explains the importance of having a Will and why it should be prepared by a qualified professional. Having a Will prepared is often something we know we should do but which we put off either because we are too busy or because we do not want to think about our own mortality. However, if you die without a Will it can often have complex and fraught consequences for the loved ones you have left behind. The main reasons why you should have a Will are: To specify who you wish to inherit your money and other assets when you die; To appoint the…

Sills & Betteridge Solicitors recognised for helping to secure vital funds for Cancer Research UK

Sills & Betteridge Solicitors have been thanked by Cancer Research UK after facilitating over £878,000 worth of gifts from people choosing to leave a legacy to the charity in their will. Sills & Betteridge Solicitors were presented with a Silver Certificate to acknowledge the firm’s ongoing support. The firm have been offering the Free Will Service to people aged 55 and over (and those with cancer of any age) in Skegness for the past 3 years, giving guidance and support to those wishing to write a will or update an exisiting one. As part of the service, Sills & Betteridge Solicitors also give guidance to those wishing to leave a…

What happens to your estate if you don’t leave a Will?

Most people will know what a Will is. It is a legal document which details how a person would like their “Estate” (which is made up of assets such as property, money and possessions) to be distributed after they pass away. The person who is making the Will is known as the “testator”. The two main reasons for leaving a Will are to protect your children and to provide for the people for whom you want to provide, which is why it is so important to make a Will. Whilst most people know what a Will is, a surprisingly large number of people pass away without leaving a Will. They…

What rights do cohabiting couples have when their partner dies?

Recent research carried out by the insurance company Direct Line showed that 38% – more than one third – of cohabiting couples living in the UK were unsure of what their rights would be should their partner pass away without leaving a will, and that one in ten cohabiting couples wrongly believed that they would be automatically entitled to inherit their partner’s share of any property that they lived in together. However, this is not the case. A surviving partner will only inherit if this is stated in the deceased partner’s will. This can come as an extremely nasty surprise to some people who are already mourning following the loss…